Tuesday, March 20, 2018

the hospital tour

You never realize how deep the desire to be known and understood is until your find yourself with a group of people who know and understand absolutely nothing about about you.

A 2 year-old Johnny walking by the entrance to the NICU where he spent his first of life.

That was me this past weekend as I went to tour the hospital where baby number 3 will most likely be born this summer. For a variety of different reasons it won't work out for me to deliver at either of the hospitals where my other two children were born. So, I spent my Saturday afternoon with a group a strangers walking through hospital wings and peering into delivery rooms.  

As we waited for the tour to start I felt on edge, not because I'm uneasy about delivering this third baby, but because I didn't want the people around me to think that this is my first baby. "No, no" I wanted to say, "I've done this before. I have two kids already, they're at home with my husband. I'm married. See my ring? It's nap time so they all stayed home. But since this is my third it's not super important for my husband to come along. We know what we're doing."

The tour began, and each step along the way brought up memories and experiences that reminded me of all the profound ways becoming a mother has changed me. And it bothered me that no one else knew these things about me. At each turn I felt compelled to blurt out something personal about myself.

We entered a spacious room with a giant free standing tub. Water birth. My daughter was born in the water and it was a wonderful experience. My main objective in attending the hospital tour was to scope out the water birth accommodations. As I listened attentively to everything the tour guide was saying about water births, I noticed some other members of our group eyeing the tub suspiciously, others glazing over as the information was being presented to them. I wanted to shout out to them, "it's not weird, this is not a joke. I did this and it was amazing!"


The tour guide talked about what kinds of things you might do if your labor goes on a while and you're at the hospital for more than just a day or two. 

"That was me with my first" I wanted to say. "I was in labor with him for 50 hours. And yes, it was terrible." 

Next she covered the infant screening that takes place in the hospital. She spent several minutes explaining the hearing test, telling us not to worry if our baby fails the hearing test. "Many babies fail that first test because they still have amniotic fluid in their ears. It can take several days to drain out. You'll just repeat the test with your pediatrician and everything will be fine."

"Unless your baby is one of the less than 1% of kids born with hearing loss in the US, like my son. Then he or she will have to have more comprehensive testing done and be fitting with hearings aids as soon as possible. And then you'll have regular audiology appointments to monitor their hearing, and you'll want to find a good speech therapist, and you may want to consider learning sign language too....."

The tour ended with a walk by the entrance to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, which shares a floor with Labor and Delivery, and which is the very same NICU my son was transferred to when he was one day old. 

It's been almost 5 years since my baby was taken to the NICU, but of all the sorrows in my life that one feels freshest and stings the hardest. 

The tour guide talked calmly about the close proximity of  Labor and Delivery to the NICU, and if in the unlikely event that your baby will need to go there, it is very easy to come visit him or her. 

"But you have no idea what it's like to hobble down these hallways with fresh stitches in your body and legs still unsteady from the trauma of delivery"

She explained the layout of the private NICU rooms and mentioned the fold out couch available to parents who want to stay with their babies after they themselves have been discharged.

"Sure, it's a private room. But nothing feels more public than carrying your pads and peri-bottle to the unit's shared bathrooms every time you need to need to relieve yourself."

Hopefully you never need to go inside the NICU, she said, but it's nice to know it's there if you do.

"But if you do, it's ok to be upset, it's ok to cry and to feel like your world as falling apart, because it's really really hard. It might be the worst thing you ever go through. And you might not ever get over it. And that's ok too." 


But I didn't say any of those things. I just blinked quickly at the floor. Then we headed back to the lobby where the tour began, without anyone ever knowing all those things I had gone through, with them probably assuming I was a first time parent, just like everyone else.

And that's when I realized I was doing the very thing I didn't want done to me - making assumptions.

Since the start of the hospital tour I had been making assumptions about every other person in the group - first time parent, inexperienced, naive, uninformed, too natural, not natural enough - even though I knew nothing about them, or their experiences. 

And how could I?  We can't see experiences, we can only learn about them through increased intimacy over time. 

It's ok that I didn't share my life's story with my hospital tour group. And it was probably best for my ego that I didn't. But the experience was a good reminder to me that you can't possibly begin to scratch the surface of a person at first glance. I could no more know what scars and memories those other people brought with them to the hospital that day than they could know mine. We are, each of us, incredibly complex, that is a part of the beauty of humanity. Each person I encounter deserves not my judgement, but the dignity of my compassion and understanding. Who knows what I would find out about them if I could take the time to scratch the surface.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Life and Death. Lent and Easter.

Alex's dad died on November 10th of last year.

On November 11th I took a pregnancy test.

It was positive.

Walking into our bedroom while it was still dark, flicking on the lamp, and showing Alex that positive pregnancy test - the day after his dad died - was a little less than God parting the clouds and bending down to look us straight in the eyes and say, "yes there is death, but it's not the end. I also bring life."

We were not "trying" for this baby. Not like with the other two, where we tried for months in one case and years in the other. But we are open to life, and that means you accept it when it comes, whether it's a good time or not. By worldly standards this was not a great time to be having another baby. We already have two young kids who still have all the needs of young kids, plus the unique needs of a kid with hearing loss and other chronic health problems. Alex was still in school, about to graduate with the student dept he had amassed over the last couple of years, and as of that time no job lined up to pay it off.

But in one very important way it was the perfect time for a new baby.

I believe it is no coincidence that while we were grieving the first big family loss that either of us had experienced, we got our first surprise baby. It was as though I were hearing it for the first time - God alone is the author of life and death. Sometimes we're able to trick ourselves into thinking we're in control, but really, none of this is up to us. And when it seems like we are surrounded by death, He gives signs of life, a small foretaste of the Everlasting Life that He offers us.


It's now four months later. We are in the middle of Lent. I normally love the season of Lent, but not this year. I've had enough of sorrows. It's cold, it's dark, my body is in varying but constant levels of pain from carrying this child. Extreme exhaustion, the unrelenting demands of parenting and work, and a winter that never seems to end leave me feeling a little bit dead inside. I look out my window and see the decay of last year's garden poking out from under the snow in my backyard. I long for signs of life.

Then I feel the kick against my ribs. I see a patch of grass where the snow is slowly receding. I look at my calendar and see that Easter is only two weeks away.

Signs of life. Reminders that He is as faithful as the changing of seasons.

Spring after winter. Easter after Lent. Life after death.

Friday, January 12, 2018

Winter Offerings

Hygge. Pretty sure I'm pronouncing it wrong but doing it right. The snow it falling thickly outside. I'm wrapped up in a wool sweater and cozy blanket, sipping some hot tea, and when I'm done on the computer I will be turning to my book and knitting basket.


I admire people who get outside for real winter activities, you know, ice skating, sledding, broom ball, but this is about as active as my winter gets. It's cozy, my feet stay dry, why mess with something that works? 

I have a few winter offerings for you my gentle readers. The first two are for everyone, and the second two are just for local ladies I'm afraid. 

First, a playlist to aid and inspire the spirit of Hygge. During the roughest weeks of my morning sickness I was so out of it I wasn't even listening to music. A couple of weeks ago I started putting some playlists on again while I was hanging out with the kids or working in the kitchen. I was so pleasantly surprised by how having good music on in the background lifted the mood! Just because it's dark and dreary outside doesn't mean it has to be inside!



Second, did you know that Lent starts in less than 5 weeks? I know, it doesn't seem possible. We literally just took our Christmas tree down. But it's coming up, and I have found that when I plan ahead for my liturgical seasons, even a little bit, I enjoy them so much more. For Advent this was as simple as knowing where my Advent wreath and candles were before the first Sunday of Advent, and having my BIS Advent journal in my possession and ready to go. For lent I plan to have a couple charitable organizations picked out to practice some alms giving, and of course, I will have my Blessed is She Lenten She Who Believed Journal to be my daily companion.


I am thrilled that Laura Kelly Fanucci is back writing the Lenten journal. During this Lent we will be looking at different women in scripture and what they can teach us about prayer. I am excited to learn some new things, especially about some of the lesser known characters. Be sure to get yours early before they sell out! Or, grab the whole 2018 Lent Bundle


There are all sorts of other new products available in the Blessed is She Shop, I'm not going to mention them all, but I will mention The Catholic Journaling Bible. It's been a long time coming and has been wildly popular. I have one and it is beautiful. I know it is something I will use for the rest of my life. For everything else just go take a look. And if you kindly use any of the links in this post I will get a small kick back as an affiliate. Thanks! 



Also, have you heard that there is going to be a Blessed is Retreat in the Twin Cities? Are you jumping up and down with excitement? The Wild Retreat is coming to St. Paul on August 11. Tickets are on sale now! I have never been to a Blessed is She retreat, so I am really looking forward to finally experiencing one for myself. 

Finally, for those who are local to the Twin Cities, I will be teaching a knitting class on February 24th through a very cool project that my friend Cara is spearheading. It's called The Dorothy Exchange, and it's a women's skillshare. This is the third class that she has organized. The first two were great successes and I'm so excited to be able to be involved in this one and pass on my love for knitting. For details on where and how to register you can check out Cara's post on the class. Spaces are limited, so register soon if you'd like a spot! I hope to see you there!

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

2017 in 12 Photos


J A N U A R Y 


Looking back through the blog it seems that we were sick a lot in January, and that I was doing hygge before it was an Instagram sensation. I'm so proud of myself. Also, I can't believe Trixie was ever that small. She still stands on that stool between the sinks, only now her head towers way above that shelf and she can easily reach all of the faucets. 


F E B R U A R Y 


February is when winter seems most endless and we begin to drive each other crazy. Being cooped up with babies all winter is rough. I wrote this very sweet post reminding myself how great it can be with those babies.  P.s. I made those, the babies, and the sweaters. 

M A R C H


Johnny had spring break. I think it snowed every day that week. So we made our way to the conservatory to pretend that it was spring. I also helped put on the CWBN Midwest Conference. It was a lot of work, and a lot of fun. 

A P R I L


I finished a sweater that I had been working on all winter, Alex and I finally figured out a prayer routine that works for us, Lent, Easter, and the daily grind of motherhood.

M A Y


Johnny turned four,  He finished his first full year at his school for deaf and hard of hearing kids. We were thrilled with the progress he made in his speech during that year. And I closed my piano studio after teaching for ten years.

J U N E


We did a big rearranging of rooms in our house, since I was no longer using one of our main level rooms as a teaching studio. We spent as much time outside as possible, and, not surprisingly, I did some more reflecting on motherhood. 

J U L Y


Lots of family time and outside time. This summer marked the 10 year anniversary of when Alex and I started dating. I marked the occasion by writing about how we met

A U G U S T 


We took our annual trip to the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe with friends. I turned 31 and did a lot of gardening. The only blogging I managed was this giant photo update. 

S E P T E M B E R


I made a lot of hats, Alex started his final rotation of PA school, and Johnny started school again, this year going five full days a week. The beginning of a new school year is so chaotic and exhausting, so I was doing some thinking about self-care. 

O C T O B E R 


Trixie turned two! I am realizing now, much to my shame, that I never did a birthday post for her! Nevertheless, she had a wonderful birthday, she got a baby doll who has come with her everywhere everyday since then. Trixie continues to be a our sweet and joyful girl. 

N O V E M B E R


November was hard and joyful month in our home. Alex's dad passed away after battling cancer. There was much sadness and grief, but we also had a lot of special time with Alex's family. We also found out I was pregnant with baby no. 3! I'm so grateful for God's timing with this baby. 

D E C E M B E R


Alex graduated from PA school, passed his boards, accepted a job, and then got the break we have been dreaming about for the last 2.5 years. The timing of this break couldn't have been better, as I was struck down with morning sickness. Alex has been doing everything around the house and for the kids, and taking extra good care of me. My morning sickness started to ease up a few days before Christmas, allowing me to enjoy this beautiful season even more. 

Happy New Year to you all! And thanks to Bobbi for hosting my favorite link up! 
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